Remembrance Sunday service – Stow Maries Aerodrome -13 November 2016

A Remembrance Sunday service, wreath laying ceremony and flypast took place at Stow Maries Aerodrome – the most original World War One aerodrome still in existence. The aerodrome opened in 1916 with the aim of protecting London from attack by Zeppelin airships and Gotha bombers. Closed in 1919 the land was returned to farm use but most of the buildings remained untouched and are now being carefully restored. A memorial has been erected on the parade ground, by which the service took place. Three Stampe biplanes from the Tiger Club carried out a poppy drop before flying over the parade ground.

Later in the day the new owner of the Nieuport 17 replica now based at Stow Maries took it up for one of his first flights in the aircraft. The Essex Police helicopter also passed through, waggling his ‘wings’.

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Great War Aerodrome Centenary Show – Stow Maries, Essex – 18 September 2016

An airshow and fly-in took place at Stow Maries Aerodrome to mark its centenary. It is the most original World War One aerodrome still in existence, and was opened in September 1916 with the aim of protecting London from attack by Zeppelin airships and Gotha bombers. Closed in 1919, the land was returned to agricultural use but many of the airfield’s buildings have remained untouched and are now being preserved and restored. A number of replica Great War aircraft are now based at Stow Maries, and a BE2 performed at the event, a type that served there one hundred years ago. A Sopwith Snipe illustrated the evolution of Great War aviation, with its more robust build and armament. The ever popular Turbulent Display Team performed their ‘barnstorming’ acts, including accurate flour-bombing – as witnessed by the condition of their target ‘Chateau le Turbs’!

When flying had finished for the day the airside gate was opened to allow the public the welcome opportunity to get a closer look at the aircraft.

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Vintage Flying Event – Stow Maries – 15 May 2016

An airshow and fly-in took place at Stow Maries Aerodrome – the most original World War One aerodrome still in existence. The aerodrome opened in 1916 as one of three locally with the aim of protecting London from attack by Zeppelin airships and Gotha bombers. When closed in 1919 after a short period of service the land was returned to agricultural use, but many of the buildings have remained untouched into their centenary. Work has taken place over recent years to restore the structures and produce a museum site illustrating the aerodrome’s wartime existence. A number of replica Great War aircraft are now based here and one of those, a BE2, performed at the event, a type that served here one hundred years ago. The weekend’s weather was changeable but mostly fine, allowing for a large turn-out of visiting light aircraft and a small display programme.

For further events throughout the year visit http://www.stowmaries.org.uk/news/events for details.

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Stow Maries Fly In – 6 September 2015

The blue sky over the historic Great War aerodrome on the Sunday of the weekend event gives little indication of the weather conditions which limited the flying activity at the fly in. None of the World War One reproductions were able to get airborne on the Saturday, and only the Albatros made it aloft on the Sunday – giving Rob Gauld-Galliers his first chance to fly in a World War One Heritage Aviation Trust (WAHT) machine. The increasing number of WWI airframes were displayed outside whilst a couple of yet to be assembled new arrivals were on view in the hangar. A few visiting aircraft also braved the elements, and some – including a smart Stearman in US Navy colours – carried out a pass on departure.

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Remembrance Sunday Service at Stow Maries – 8 November 2015

A Remembrance Sunday service and wreath laying ceremony took place at Stow Maries Aerodrome – one of the most original World War One aerodromes still in existence. The aerodrome opened in 1916 with the aim of protecting London from attack by Zeppelin airships and Gotha bombers. When closed in 1919 the land was returned to agricultural use, but most of the buildings remained untouched and are now being carefully preserved and restored. A memorial has been erected on the parade ground, at which the service took place. A planned poppy drop had to be cancelled due to high winds, though a small number of brave visitors did fly in.

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Service for planting of Ceramic Poppies at Stow Maries WWI Aerodrome – 19 April 2015

Ten ceramic poppies from the ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’ art installation were ‘planted’ during a service of remembrance at Stow Maries Aerodrome, in memory of the airmen of 37 (Home Defence) Squadron who died whilst serving the squadron during World War One. The art installation of 888,246 poppies surrounded the Tower of London during 2014 commemorating one hundred years since the start of WWI, after which they were posted out to individuals and groups. The poppies were purchased using donations by the ‘Friends of Stow Maries Aerodrome’.

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