London Marathon 2014 – 13 April 2014

First run on 29 March 1981, this 34th Marathon saw the separate groups of starters: Elite Women, Elite Men, Wheelchair (Men and Women), IPC, followed by the Mass Race, running the 26.2 mile distance from Greenwich to The Mall, passing many of the capital’s iconic landmarks on route. Britain’s Olympian Mo Farah was a strong contender, leading to high hopes of a home win but was inexperienced over the distance and only managed an eighth place finish. Wilson Kipsang won the Men’s race with a course record of 2.04.29. As well as being a competitive athletic race the London Marathon is also a large celebratory sporting festival with fun runners gaining sponsorship worth many millions. The event has raised over £450 million for charity since 1981 and holds the Guinness world record as the largest annual fund raising event in the world.

Seen here passing the Tower of London is eventual winner Kipsang followed by Stanley Biwott who held that second position to the tape:

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Tsegaye Kebede finished third with Ayele Abshero just a second behind:

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Mo Farah:

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Other British finishers included Chris Thompson (eleventh), Ben Livesey (fifteenth) and Scott Overall (seventeenth):

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Although seen here leading, Florence Kiplagat came home three seconds behind Edna Kiplagat (incredibly no relation!):

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Track athlete Turinesh Dibaba managed a commendable third on her marathon debut:

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Other top finishers included Tetyana Gamera-Shmyrko (seventh) and Ana Dulce Felix (eighth):

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British athletes Amy Whitehead and Emma Stepto finished a respectable thirteenth and fourteenth:

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Whilst the ‘Elite’ runners take most of the headlines, the other categories are just as competitive. First out on the track are the wheelchair racers, including:

Krige Schabort (fifteenth in men’s class) being chased down by Denis Lemeunier (fourteenth):Image

In the Women’s race number 7 Manuela Schar managed to overtake Wakako Tsuchida to come home second and third respectively:

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Highest British woman finisher was number 6 Shelly Woods:

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More able bodied athletes take part under the IPC grouping, with T11-T13 visual impairment and T42-T46 amputee classes.

Gabriel Macchi (and his guide) finished fourth in the Men’s race:

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Maria Paredes Rodriguez won the Women’s category:

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Inspirational figure Richard Whitehead was the sole T42 category competitor, finishing in a time of 3.42.04:

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Winning club runner was Steven Way of Bournmouth AC:

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And then of course there are the fun runners who for many people make the event what it is:

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